What should we now do? – Climate Change Teacher in Every School

OPEN LETTER: This afternoon, Tuesday the 23rd April, Greta Thunberg spoke at a special meeting of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Climate Change at 2pm, in the Attlee Suite, Portcullis House and all MPs are invited to attend… #Education

Harwood Education Ltd

I do not want to declare a Climate Emergency, that ship has already sailed and now even the deniers are in agreement, after Sir David Attenborough spelled it out clearly to all humanity in his most recent hard hitting documentary on #BBC1, that we have less than a decade to mitigate the greenhouse gasses that are heating up our planet at a rate that is well beyond all the legal agreements our governments have signed up to in both the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement.

No, I want to talk about a Climate Change Teacher in Every School! A joint partnership, set up between a #UK based education company, Harwood Education and the One UN Climate Change Learning Partnership (UNITAR; UN CC:Learn) has created an innovative solution that will ensure every child receives the very best climate change learning that the UN has created. They have launched the Climate Change Teacher Course on World #EarthDay in the United Kingdom. This trial launch has been sponsored by YPO, they need at least 80 Teachers to sign-up and do the easy audio/visual online course that, when completed, will leave those teachers accredited as the very first Climate Change Teachers in the World, and these teachers will be at the forefront of delivering climate change literacy to all the pupils that attend the schools they teach in.

While global attention has been directed to various climate campaigns, this new Climate Change Teachers Course and its accompanying UN:eduCCate Programme are pioneering Climate Literacy here in the UK first, before they scale up to every school worldwide.

I would also ask you, as an MP of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second’s Government, if you would be interested in taking part in this groundbreaking trial of the Climate Change Teacher Course, that is fully accredited by the One UN Climate Learn Partnership, yourself? Surely every MP should know all the facts about Climate Change:

  • The Legal Framework
  • Climate Change and Cities
  • Climate Change and Health
  • Climate Change and Gender
  • Climate Change and Science

Plus all the scientific facts on GHGs (Greenhouse Gasses for those MPs that don’t yet know this) and #SDGs (our Government signed the United Kingdom up to the Sustainable Development Goals but most of us are unaware of the fact that we have not achieved nearly any of the goals they signed our country up to!).

Today, Tuesday 23 April, MPs had the opportunity to hear #GretaThunberg speak at a special meeting of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Climate Change at 2pm, in the Attlee Suite, Portcullis House. As an MP I am asking you to please listen. More than 1.5 million children and young people worldwide attended the #schoolstrikes for climate in March – a global movement which started with just one child, Greta Thunberg.

Young people, including myself, across the UK continue monthly strikes, demanding action on climate change, But I want to go one step further and I want to demand that we have one Climate Change Teacher in Every School!

We desperately need Climate Change Teachers qualified to deliver the UN:educcate Programme, which delivers more than 500 lessons, all based on the current school curriculum but with Climate Change Literacy at their core in every class-room.

We know that our youth will enter the work force which will need them to be climate change literate and able to strive through social innovation.

Not just for future generations but for those in countries such as Mozambique, already suffering the impacts of climate change today.

They tell us that much more needs to be done and much faster.

Don’t we all agree we have an urgency and it is our responsibility to listen and act?

More information is available here: https://www.unccteacheracademy.com

I would be very grateful if you could let me know if you will be participating.

This is an opportunity for all teachers, teaching assistants, absolutely anybody working in a school in this country and educating our youth, to become climate change literate, confident to share climate change best practices. We must ensure that these specialist teachers join a global network of 200,000 scientists, #policy makers, researchers and practitioners from 190+ countries that have acquired the same essentials and therefore understand more of how and why climate change is happening, as well as the mitigation and adaptation we need to deliver to halt the rise in temperature immediately.

We need a Climate Change Teacher in Every School so that they can go on to share their newly acquired knowledge with all students now that we are at one of the most critical points in our species’ existence because we all know that this is a #ClimateEmergency and we want action not words but real, tangible, useful action now.

I look forward to meeting you all at the All Parliamentary Group on Climate Change Event today, to discuss the above with you, in person.

Hannah-Jane Kento, 11 Years Old, Year 7A, Hitchin Girls School, Hertfordshire

www.unccteacheracademy.com

#TeachersForFuture #WeLoveTheEarth #TiempoDeActuar #TimeForAction #CallToAction #TellTheTruth #GlobalNewDeal

Every local government need to develop an Urban Conservation Emergency Evacuation Plan (#UCEEP)

Every local government needs to develop an Urban Conservation Emergency Evacuation Plan (#UCEEP) (.pdf-document for download here) (.pdf-Executive Summary for download here)

Dealing with a climate crisis has now gone planetary — Cities’ planners and policymakers must protect vulnerable citizens by having an Urban Conservation Emergency Evacuation Plan policy in place, for the outcome of the New Urban Agenda and monitored by the Sendai Framework, that is proven realistic in an actual emergency. Environment havoc in the footsteps of climate change require, for the first time, to mainstream local conservation against disasters in all relief planning…

Executive Summary

Paper on Urban Conservation Emergency Evacuation Plan (UCEEP 2.0)

The UCEEP (Safe #CitiinCiti) innovative project/initiative was realised with clarity that safeguarding, protection and shelter has overall the highest command in any emergency in relation to mass activities -> Climate Action response risk assessing urban resilience will by far have the most efficient adaptation/mitigation impact. Poor urban planning, lack of ecosystem restoration and short medium/long-term environment decisions are already affecting the human health globally.

‘A system of local conservation emergency evacuation urban craters, capturing rainwater will give a new town/city protection and balance megacities, second cities and their urban sprawl/spawn, it might even be a supportive link between the city and it’s green belt definition. Cooling carbon sinks against urban heat waves and balancing micro climates with positive green outcome can generate many health and safety benefits at the same time offer shelter and protection to its area districts.’
Regional offices, local governments, planners and policy makers must protect vulnerable citizens by having an ”Urban Conservation Emergency Evacuation Plan” policy in place, proven to be realistic in an actual emergency, when implementing our global frameworks. E.g. unavoidable human-made hazards which are related to our changing climate (climate-induced disaster). How can we ensure necessary mitigation/adaptation planning documentation is up-to-date? Key words Decarbonisation – Biodiversity – Greenfield land and Natural space Water resources and Air quality – Climate change – Public space Social inclusion and Integration – Restoration.

The creation UCEEP paper become clear when the 2015/16 when five globally binding agreements came in place changing the world agenda delivering to the Agenda 2030, the Global Goals; these are;

  • The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) – June 2015
  • The Addis Ababa Action Agenda (AAAA) of the agreement Financing for Development. A global framework for financing development – July 2015
  • The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – September 2015
  • The Paris climate agreement (PA) is an agreement within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) – Dec. 2015
  • The New Urban Agenda (NUA), which will serve as a guideline for sustainable urban development for the next eighteen years – October 2016 http://nua.unhabitat.org/list1.htm#

The aim of a second draft UCEEP 2.0 paper is to equip member states with a state-of-art emergency solution, CO2lution if you so like.

An URBAN CONSERVATION EMERGENCY EVACUATION PLAN (UCEEP) is a physical cradle for the Global Goals. First and foremost an UCEEP provides protection and shelter to urban residents, it’s assets and urban environment. Secondary on medium-term building on the Sustainable Development Goals, investing in the UCEEP a scalable multi-function CO2lution will generate long-term health and well-being to the people and the planet.

Considering general emergency policies of the national government a second draft UCEEP to compliment the 2030 agenda, for urban settlement equipped with detailed evacuation plans for facilitating and handling climate crisis as seen daily in every continent on the planet. On the work of Climate Ambition with Governments and Stakeholders; Non-state actor’s, Multi-actor’s governance and Multi-stakeholders’ platforms; What role can regional partners play to bridge the national implementation agenda with the global guiding principles and frameworks? How can nations synergise and harness efforts to protect and offer urban preparedness to urban hazardous-zones and at what level?

United Nations expressed in report the urgency of implementation of the SDGs together with the New Urban Agenda. To embed an Urban Conservation Emergency Evacuation Plan (UCEEP) policy in place on the international agenda is a transformative change in urban risk-behaviour.
– First, give evidence that disaster risk assessment in every action will support mitigation efforts and further generate understanding and positive impact of carbon and methane reductions to help increase the ambition of states Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) by 2020. UCEEP to protect, restore and promote sustainable use of urban ecosystems?

Climate Disaster Action CO2lutions to Sustainable Cities and Communities in partnership “Making Cities Resilient” to achieve the goals. Well-designed urban growth, in e.g. urban regeneration and disaster risk management adaption with Urban Conservation Emergency Evacuation Planning is a way forward; We need an operative Climate Action Agenda Foster implementation – Citizens integration in practice Hi policy level endorsement Monitoring minimal criteria Identify capacity overlaps for implementation – pressure points Green force new sectors Attention to biology and ecology knowledge / Millennials Eco-implementors? Great big product moving in on direction Data visibility Learning from taking stock ~ “Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss”.

An UCCEP will offer each one protection in urban safe-zones while empowering people and offer to everyone a place where one genuine feel inclusiveness and equality (as part of something bigger). Any successful  realistic UCEEP will require regular effectiveness drills. Can you imagine a physical place doing good for humanity and at the same time healing the urban/natural environment… ?

The main purpose with the second draft UCEEP paper is to fast-track Agenda 2030, at the same time slow carbon emissions and protect urban vulnerable people from disaster, support business contingency with the UCEEP concept “Safe CitiinCiti” all in one transferable Multipurpose Conservation CO2lution.

The UCEEP concept is set for development and is looking for “Declaration of interest” from new state/non-state actors to form a universal multi-partnership for Disaster “Safe CitiinCiti” CO2lutions.

The UCEEP paper has as a concept been recognised by several global organisation, leaders, scientists, politicians, from the global climate change action (CCA) agenda, the disaster preparedness community (disaster risk reduction (DRR)), SDG stakeholders, World Urban Forum etc. 2019 is momentum for change, support creation for a Global UCEEP Standard. Looking at CO2lutions globally, you might save $$$ in any other cases, the point really is that investing… Investing in resilience always pays. Mobilise finance for skills enhancement, technology transfer and demonstrations to put in place the tools needed for early warning systems, preparedness, risk-informed development planning and better use of natural resources for sustainable energy practices

Climate Change Centre Reading, UK
(Civil Society/Non-profit organisation. Project/initiative to take place inside and outside the European Union.)

#APAN2018 #UR2018 #90drills #ThisIsZeroHour #UCEEP #iddr2018 #SendaiFramework #Disaster #Storm #ClimateAction #climatechange #planning #climate #urban #cities #globalization #resiliency #urbanplanning #drilling #urbandesign #placemaking #urbanism #urbanization #urbanagriculture #storms #announcements #urbangardening #googling #urbanecology #urbanforestry #urbangeography #rdguk #co2lutions #climateambition #sdgdrr #sdg18 #undevelopment #globalisation #rdg #clties4climate #rdgnews #globalgoals #haemorrhagingdisaster #urbanisation #howto

#ConservationAction #LandStewardship #TalanoaDialogue #GCAS2018 #CitiesIPCC #COP24 #FutureofPlaces #Greenbelt #DRR
#Placemaking #COP21 #COP22 #COP23 #UrbanAction #Habitat3 #NewUrbanAgenda #PublicSpace
#WUC #TheFutureWeWant #TheCityWeNeed #UrbanSDG #UrbanAction #UrbanThinkers #NetZero
#Youngplacemakers #Roadmap2030 #ClimateAction #Vulnerability #Planetary #SDG11 #Listen2Cities
#NoCountryAlone #NewUrbanGovernance #NAZCAportal #UNEA2 #Cities4Climate #G7EMM
#Listen2Cities #SB48Bonn #SB44 #APA1 #Bonn #Pre2020Action #C40Award #AOSIS #GUANXI

#ClimateAction #UNEA2 #NewUrbanGovernance #Cities4Climate #FortMacFire #yeg #ymmfire #NAZCAportal #climatechance

The Gauteng Declaration – #Inclusive #Cities

The Gauteng Declaration

DECLARE THAT:
We share the willingness to work towards metropolises for and by their citizens, where participatory and effective metropolitan governance fosters economic development, sustainability, social cohesion and justice, gender equality and good quality of life;

We are committed to fostering links and exchanges between political leaders, policy makers and practitioners worldwide; to advocating for metropolitan interests and improving the performance of metropolises in addressing local and global challenges;

We are dedicated to the transformation of our institutions and the strengthening of governance systems to respond to the aspirations of a rapidly urbanising population; addressing urban sustainability challenges related to housing, infrastructure, basic services, climate change, food security and migrations; and ending violations of human rights;

We recognize that metropolitan areas are expanding due to the galvanising power of proximity, agglomeration and innovation; that targeted transformation of cities and city regions, which are the cradle of our heritage, is critical to the vision of a brighter and more inclusive future; and that urbanisation is already bearing fruits by lowering overall poverty, raising household incomes, and creating new opportunities;

We acknowledge the impact of metropolitan areas on their surrounding territories, hinterland, peripheral cities and intermediary cities; and that metropolitan priorities and policies need to consider these effects on countries as a whole;

We celebrate that the Forum of African Metropolises is convened as an important mechanism to develop knowledge and know-how among peers in a rapidly urbanising continent;

We understand that the objectives set forth by the international community to meet global challenges cannot be fulfilled without the involvement and commitment of metropolises and all local governments.

WE CALL FOR:

More means to effectively localise the Sustainable Development Goals, the New Urban Agenda and Paris Agreement on Climate Change; and to address the environmental, economic, social and governance dimensions of exclusion in metropolitan areas;

Partners around the world to join us in advocating for metropolitan interests, as we address local and global challenges, thus enhancing our collaborations towards the ideal of inclusive metropolises for and by their citizens;

A seat at the global table, recognizing the role that metropolitan areas must play in the development of policies at national, regional and international level;

Support in research and innovation on metropolitan governance and needs;

Enhanced mechanisms to allow exchange between metropolitan areas, and specific programmes that can support renewal and policy innovation at all levels;

International acknowledgment of the existing mechanisms that promote dialogue between the international community and subnational governments of all sizes, the Global Taskforce of Local and Regional Governments.

WE REAFFIRM OUR DETERMINATION TO:

Foster inclusive cities expand opportunities through inclusive settlements and mobility options, support asset-building for sustainable livelihoods, and tackle land-based exclusion;

Defy the trappings of social exclusion which occur in the form of inequality, discrimination, racism, patriarchy, sexism, hetero-sexism and intolerance;

Exercise leadership on the world stage to solve the local and global issues that affect the world population, as set forth in the Montréal Declaration proclaimed at the XII Metropolis World Congress held last year;

Harness the potential of technology to reduce costs and level the playing field for inclusive development, and foster just, inclusive, adaptive, responsive, transparent and accountable governments;

Work together with national and international institutions, and especially with peers from the Global Taskforce of Local and Regional Governments, in advocacy mechanisms, such as the Urban 20 initiative, towards achieving the shared ambitious objectives of the global agenda, while enhancing the voice of metropolitan communities worldwide;

Call upon more partners around the world to join us advocating for diverse metropolitan perspectives, in our commitment to the ideal of inclusive metropolises for and by their citizens.

More so the Metropolis family will continue to draw inspiration from the life convictions of our global icon, Nelson Mandela.

 

Source: Metropolis Gauteng 2018

The draft National Planning Policy  Framework #NPPF

 Jul 18 The government is due to publish the draft National Planning Policy  Framework (NPPF) imminently. Will it past our eight placemaking tests?”

 

1 Does it restore a genuine commitment towards sustainable development and the welfare of future generations?

 

2 Does it reflect the Garden City Principles by committing to using part of the profits from development for the long-term benefit of the community?

 

3 Does it rewrite the viability test to ensure that policy which enhances people’s lives and saves public money over the long term is equally as important as landowner and developer profit?

 

4 Does it prioritise good design and set out mandatory space standards for new homes?

 

5 Does it re-prioritise action on climate change, making clear that planning must deliver the carbon reduction target stated in the Climate Act?

 

6 Does it prioritise the promotion of people’s health and well being in planning decisions?

 

7 Does it focus on a meaningful definition of housing affordability based on people’s ability to pay, prioritising social rented homes?

 

8 Does it defend people’s rights to participate in the planning process?

 

More here, https://mainstreaminggreeninfrastructure.com/blog/posts.php?NPPF2-Hopes

Source: tcpa

 

Campaign group ‘Don’t Trash The Thames’ saves ancient riverside #UK #Mitigation

Objectors raise concerns to unnecessary degrading development by our ‘public garden’ which is used for the purposes of public recreation, our public open riverside space.

Wokingham Council planning committee turns down MRT bus lane bridge plan <3

PLANS to concrete over land by the River Thames were turned down by the planning committee on Monday evening. Five members voted against and four in favour.

The extraordinary meeting was held at Wokingham Borough Council’s Shute End offices on Monday evening and the decision was made just weeks after Reading Borough Council approved plans for its side of the scheme…

https://www.wokinghampaper.com/wokingham-council-turns-down-mrt-bus-lane-bridge-plan

Source: The Wokingham Paper

SAFETY PLANING INTERVENTION – OPEN LETTER – READING NEW LOCAL PLAN CONSULTATION

Lead Councillor Tony Page, the Strategic Environment, Planning & Transport Committee (SEPT) and the New Local Plan responses to public concerns – Turning bad practice into good

Optimistic view of town planning services!

SUMMARY – The Local Plan is the document that contains the policies and sites for how Reading will develop up to 2036. It identifies the amount of development that will take place, the areas and sites where development is expected to be accommodated, and where it will be restricted, and sets out policies for how planning applications will be decided. *

WHY – The Reading New Local Plan (NLP) 2018-2036 and its consultation is flawed and is proof of local governance denial and complete ignorance. It’s a world class example of bad governance and performance. It’s appalling and very dangerous. It is also a good example of how shady town leadership is coping out and leaving behind the people of its constituency.

The Reading NLP does not comply with enough guidance or recommendations set by the government.

The current National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) contains ambitious policies on climate change but on-the-ground local authority delivery remains slow, largely because of a lack of taking on-board practical advice and support on how to secure a radical reduction in carbon emissions.

Extremely weak urban emergency planning causes harm, this requires immediate climate action to overcome the barriers faced by Reading council; such as strong leadership, collaborative ways of working, leaving corporate affiliations behind, honesty and transparency, good communication, and strong individual moral commitment.

Open local government includes the different departments of the city council and all the municipal agencies. It is considered as the institutional level closest to citizens, turning citizens into city-makers. It provides a strategic planning vision to better prepare the city to respond to disaster risks and improves people’s health, well-being and education. Furthermore, local government is responsible for ensuring the continuity of some services in the city which may include highways, energy, water and telecoms infrastructure. The Reading local government has a Duty-to-Protect all Readinger’s lives and assets, RBC Not up-to-date urban Emergency Plan and Services demands PLANNING INTERVENTION!

The Reading Borough Council (RBC) Leadership and the Strategic Environment, Planning & Transport Committee (SEPT) responsible for town housing/planning development (built environment) are required to ambitiously exceed minimum expectations, minimum regulations, especially when we are under health threat from climate change and global warming.

The Local Plan missing a Model Risk-Impact Evaluation Plan, therefore is not legally compliant.

We are not aware of a legal requirement for a ‘Model Risk-Impact Evaluation Plan’, nor are we sure what that would entail. The Local Plan has complied with its actual legal requirements.

– I’m not impressed.

“Ultimately, the Local Plan needs to work within the framework of existing national legislation and policy to set expectations for Reading. The Local Plan seeks to mitigate and adapt to climate change within the context of those expectations. However, these must be balanced against the presumption in favour of sustainable development in the NPPF and the expectation that development needs are met insofar as it possible.”

Planning Section | Directorate of Environment and Neighbourhood Services

– Who decides what is possible? This response is non-sense and refers falsely to NPPF’s framework most of to which Reading’s NLP planning documentation Not is synced with, as further below. This is directly misleading and under false interpretation.The Reading Borough Council is in breach as it is not up-to-date with the reviewed National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), changes that will come into force 2019 and the globally binding agreement the New Urban Agenda.

The Reading Borough Council is in breach as it is not up-to-date with the reviewed National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), changes that will come into force 2019 and the globally binding agreement the New Urban Agenda.

Whatever responses or remarks the SEPT will come back with, the Reading New Local Plan is Not in sync with the NPPF. The Strategic Environment, Planning & Transport Committee are aware about this shameful dilemma but choose to ignore this and the whole New Local Plan Consultation is in breach of delivering a sustainable development plan for Reading and its residents. Don’t be deceived by a local leadership that do everything in their powers to ratify an incomprehensive town plan for the next 20 years, just before the changes in the NPPF will come in place! **

E.g. Plan-making

Paragraph 23 reflects changes to the Town and Country Planning (Local Planning) (England) Regulations 2012 which come into force on 6 April 2018, requiring local planning authorities to review their local plans every five years from adoption. Under the Neighbourhood Planning Act 2017, local planning authorities must consider whether to revise the document following such a review and publish their reasons if they decide not to do so. The revised text also proposes these policy changes: Paragraph 21 expects strategic policies to be distinguished clearly in plans, to allow clear scope for local policies to be formulated.

E.g. Meeting the challenge of climate change, flooding and heat waves and rivers change

Housing White Paper proposals

Paragraph 148 refer to the risk of overheating from rising temperatures and makes clear that planning policies should support measures to ensure the future resilience of communities and infrastructure to climate change.

Paragraph 153 and its accompanying footnote incorporate the Written Ministerial Statement of 18 June 2015 on wind energy development.

Paragraph 155 clarify that plans should have regard to the cumulative impacts of flood risk, rather than just to or from individual development sites.

Paragraphs 158-162 clarify policy on the exception test that may need to be applied when considering development in locations at risk of flooding.

Paragraph 149b reflects that local planning authorities are tied to national technical standards, and there is limited scope to extend local ambition.

The Clean Growth Strategy sets out the Government’s plans for consulting on energy performance standards in Building Regulations later this year 2018. Local authorities can be an important role in improving the energy performance of buildings, in line with the ambitions of the Clean Growth Strategy, and this will be considered further as the Government develops its consultation proposals.

A new paragraph (163) has been added to incorporate the Written Ministerial Statement of 18 December 2014 on sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) in major developments.

Again, this is something Tony Page, the RBC and the SEPT very well are aware of all coming changes but choose not to act on

As the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) regulations now being checked, are we up-to-date? Again, The Reading Council is aware, even on local level with the only purpose to keep standards and legislation up-to-date with regards to all NLP planning documentation, appraisals and sub-documentation for sustainable development in our environment.

Instead of engaging, below a typical response to submissions on the consultation:

“It would be really helpful if you could let me know please in the sections of the plan where change is proposed by others, responses or changes go some way to resolving concerns.

If you do not feel that the responses or changes are helpful or appropriate, there is no need to respond to this e-mail as your existing Local Plan comments will continue to stand. Please note that we are also not seeking additional comments on the Local Plan at this time.

Please let me know if you have any queries or would like to discuss further. I will be on leave until 19th June.”

– Sent Friday the 1st June at 4pm

Added in all cases; These are minor wording changes that do not alter the policy direction.

The choice of not to take responsibility and are purposely wrong doing which is a crime carried out by climate villain.

Local government for the town of Reading is principally provided by Reading Borough Council, a single level unitary authority without civil parishes. However, some of the town’s outer suburbs are in West Berkshire and Wokingham unitary authorities. These outer suburbs belong to civil parishes, in some cases with their own town status. Since the 2010 general election, Reading and its surrounding area has been divided between the parliamentary constituencies of Reading East and Reading West. The whole of the town is within the multi-member South East England European constituency.

Why should anyone who reads this care? Because it’s in everyone’s interest this SAFETY PLANNING INTERVENTIONgenerate appropriate plans to shelter, protect and safeguard all inhabitants of our community in the best possible way.

Everything is interlinked, the sooner we realise this connection, the lesser the risk. We must rely on our local government to make the correct and bold medium-term decision for future generations. For the local authorities to carry out and deliver on – Duty-to-Protect.

Climate Change Centre Reading has over the years participated and been representing in several consultations and offered professional advice. 2015 was a turning point when the global community finally realised the dangers and threats that are upon our people’s health and wellbeing. Since 2015, ambition and inclusive are the keyword top down to local level. Why has it not happened in RBC? The conclusion is that these powers need to be investigated and dealt with. As per para 1-7;

Climate Change – Paris Agreement – SDGs in relation with regards to Reading’s future

1.      I’m afraid the in the Public Consultation does Not have a risk-impact assessment in place, this park & ride scheme will affect all Readinger’s work/life balance for the next 18 years… Protection of People and Assets in Berkshire, Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire etc…

2.      Prosperity for a healthy Economy. Looking at this globally, you might save £££ in any other cases, the point really is that investing in resilience always pays, a genuine risk assessment will half the costs instead of doing it after planning approval.

3.      Why has RBC Not carried out a Model Risk-Impact Evaluation Plan? How does the NLP align with gov’s new 25-year environment plan? Additional policy on strengthening existing networks of habitats, taking air quality fully into account. Development within National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty should be limited. Implications for policy on areas defined as Heritage Coast. Protection for ancient woodland and other irreplaceable habitats, by making clear that development resulting in their loss or deterioration should be wholly exceptional and maintains a high level of protection for individual aged or veteran trees found outside these areas. Balance between protecting these important natural assets, while allowing development to proceed in the very limited circumstances where it would have significant public benefits…

4.      In Reading we all know that Reading’s external Reading’s Climate Change Strategy(RCCP) is a joke to be honest, since 2013 only given RBC to plan freely with no climate action ambition.

“Since the original action plans were drawn up, the Council’s overall budget has reduced significantly and consequently the resource available to deliver the action plans has also reduced. We have therefore had to make difficult decisions about priorities and the result is that some actions have been delayed” after five years, please explain, the society deserve a deep and thorough understanding of this “relation” 2013-18.

5.      What is interesting, with his knowledge there seem to be no interest to repair for damage done and trying to catch up for 5 years of lost time with climate damage control measures that has yet Not been implemented in the RBC local planning policy.

6.      In the New Local Plan consultation, the usage of references in public responses and remarks to the NPPF framework is false and directly deceiving by Lead Councillor Tony Page, the SEPT and Planning Section | Directorate of Environment and Neighbourhood Services as the whole New Local Plan documentation is based on old planning policies, plans and strategies, documentation, sub-documentation and sustainability appraisals with references to sustainability appraisal scoping report and duty to co-operate scoping strategy *** Not up-to-date.

“It is not considered that there is any reason to make amendments to the Sustainability Appraisal Framework for the purposes of undertaking this appraisal. The Framework was produced recently, in 2014, and is therefore reasonably up-to-date. The Local Plan is concerned with strategic issues and does not have a limited scope that might necessitate amending the Framework. Whilst there may be plans and documents to consider that were published more recently than the Framework, or new information that has become available, these will be highlighted where relevant.”

7.      The NLP consultation claim it is an open and transparent urban planning process. When it comes to decision making, for many of the Reading residents and for a clear majority of objectors it is certainly Not open and transparent. As an increase of planning objections resulting in no changes proofing the case. Reading is Not disclosing its greenhouse gas emissions data, managing climate risk and cutting emissions. Again, instead of engaging with all non-state stakeholders and together plan for a smooth urban transition the council’s inaction will lead to an increase in residents impacted by planning fraud causing harm.

As a citizen and local resident, I’m going to report you, the SEPT Reading Borough Council somewhere I don’t know exactly where, but I will find the appropriate instance to bring the common citizens objection case due to five years of climate action ignorance and denial being calculated and carried out by the Lead Councillor Tony Page and the SEPT.

The whole preparations and launch of the consultation of the New Local Plan is highly inappropriate and purpose only seek to get away with town planning approval without having to fulfil standards.

Trying to get away with an 18 years plan with the lowest or non-safeguards is beyond foolish and should wake up voices and call for change, we do live in an enlightened and well-informed world.

The last to see and make this shift happen is not the fault our elected politicians but their instruments, especially those local authorities run by those who oppose change to powers.

These local authorities’ individuals play an important role in improving the local governance performance of Greater Reading and beyond, in line with the ambitions of the reviewed National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), this will be considered further as the Government develop its consultation on policy change proposals.

Instead of the SEPT coming with remarks to the Reading resident’s representations and objections in the NLP consultation, why don’t you invite all non-state actors to truly inclusive integrated group discussions so that we can consult and move forward with fit solutions on track to the future with a holistic overview? SOLUTION – To engage and get involved with non-state actors and local communities and expertise in an inclusive urban planning, design and decision process of town development is vital and has been avoided. The consequences will follow; the whole Reading’s New Local Plan will need to be revised with new and updated sub-documentation and sustainable appraisals and most important with a risk-impact assessment in place. Yes, this will delay the NLP planning approval for by one year but it’s worth it and will save many lives and assets doing so.

RBC IS AWARE IT NEEDS TO BE FULLY IN LINE WITH THE NATIONAL PLANNING POLICY FRAMEWORK.

Despite the outcome and go ahead for Reading’s NLP, there is so little time to repair and get this right. Government guidance has also been weak on adapting to climate change, particularly in relation to addressing issues such as heat waves and increased weather changes. PART SOLUTION – The new guide, ‘Planning for Climate Change – a Guide for Local Authorities’, was launched on Wednesday 16th May 2018. It provides an overview of policy and legislation which should be used to address climate change at a local level ****

Finally let me point out that the UK has agreed and signed the globally binding agreement – the New Urban Agenda (NUA) being revised to also be synchronised with the Global Goals, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) *****. There is Not one single reference to the New Urban Agenda in Reading’s NLP planning documentation! The Reading Council is also here aware that even on local level with the only purpose to keep standards and legislation up-to-date with regards to all NLP planning documentation, appraisals and sub-documentation for sustainable development in our environment. I suggest all planners and local leaders to have a deep look.

Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment as a catalyst towards rapidly greening our homes and the places where we work and play ****

All council’s public bodies/institutions should also divest, it is an offensive and damaging act Not to!

RESULT – The purpose with the NLP objection is via Safety Planning Intervention, policy innovation and risk/protection impact evaluation, to improve Reading’s local urban development practices, planning and design to support the British realm and ambition to become a great global leader in the fight against global warming. Also, that the whole RBC get involved with all documentation from the Ninth session of the World Urban Forum ****** that took place from 7 to 13 February 2018 at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Center – the best way to safeguard and secure Reading’s New Local Plan.

REFERENCES

* Reading New Local Plan

http://www.reading.gov.uk/newlocalplan

** NPPF Consultation

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/685288/NPPF_Consultation.pdf

*** Local Plan documents and old other planning policy documents, other old plans and strategies

http://www.reading.gov.uk/localplanexamination

http://www.reading.gov.uk/media/6245/RBC-Emergency-Plan-Policy/pdf/RBC_Emergency_Plan_Section_2_-_Policy_V5.1.pdf

http://www.reading.gov.uk/media/3798/Community-emergency-plan/pdf/Community-Emergency-Plan.pdf

**** The new guide, ‘Planning for Climate Change and Net Zero Carbon Buildings

https://www.tcpa.org.uk/Handlers/Download.ashx?IDMF=0acefe4f-9712-4b37-b2a1-06cd0f8b0293

http://www.worldgbc.org/news-media/world-green-building-council-calls-companies-across-world-make-their-buildings-net-zero

***** Links to the New Urban Agenda, SDGs (SDG11) in partnership with World Health Organization

http://nua.unhabitat.org

http://habitat3.org/the-new-urban-agenda

http://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/blog/2018/cities-2030–implementing-the-new-urban-agenda.html

https://unhabitat.org/books/international-guidelines-on-urban-and-territorial-planning

https://unhabitat.org/winners-of-the-11th-cycle-of-the-dubai-international-award-for-best-practices-to-improve-the-living-environment

https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300

****** Ninth session of the World Urban Forum – Kuala Lumpur Declaration on Cities 2030

http://wuf9.org

http://wuf9.org/kuala-lumpur-declaration

KEYWORDS

#Cities2030 #Citiesforall #NUA2030 #SDGs #WomensAssemblyWUF9 #COP24 #AAAA

#wuf9 #wuf9kl #forumbandarsedunia9 #MarrakeshPartnership #UCEEP #Bonn #Fiji #Talanoa #Talanoa4Ambition

#ConservationAction #LandStewardship #TalanoaDialogue #GCAS2018 #COP24 #FutureofPlaces #Greenbelt #DRR

#Placemaking #COP21 #COP22 #COP23 #UrbanAction #Habitat3 #NewUrbanAgenda #PublicSpace

#WUC #TheFutureWeWant #TheCityWeNeed #UrbanSDG #UrbanAction #UrbanThinkers #NetZero

#Youngplacemakers #Roadmap2030 #ClimateAction #Vulnerability #Planetary #SDG11 #Listen2Cities

#NoCountryAlone #NewUrbanGovernance #NAZCAportal #UNEA2 #Cities4Climate #G7EMM

#Listen2Cities #SB48Bonn #SB44 #APA1 #Bonn #Pre2020Action #C40Award #AOSIS #GUANXI

Kindly support our way to future proof urban development in the UK.

Your sincerely,

/Carl, Climate Change Centre Reading

Forecast; The conclusion of the 9th World Urban Forum in Kuala Lumpur – #wuf9

Kuala Lumpur, Agadir, New York, Marrakesh, Buenos Aires, Prague, Surabaya, Paris, Reading and Stockholm #forumbandarsedunia9

This is an emergency action opportunity to promote SDG18 DISASTER RISK RESILIENCE for global disaster security with reference to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Response (DRR).

Local government leaders must prioritise climate change action (CCA) to mitigate and prepare for urban disaster risk reduction (DRR).

Non-avoidable risk-impact assessment in urban planning and design Local implementation calls for the recognition and strengthening of local actors as agents for sustainable urban development and the promotion of decentralised government systems. National development plans and policies need to be drafted according to local realities. To secure ownership, local populations need to be included in planning and decision making processes. This requires the strengthening of urban capacities and administrations in order for them to fulfil their responsibilities and be responsive to local needs. Every council’s planning committees casting plans way ahead of the next World Habitat Conference 2036.

Change proposed

By adopting SDG18 DISASTER RISK RESILIENCE will provide insightful examples for cities not only on the planning and implementing of the risk-sensitive plans but also on engaging multi-sectoral dialogue in resilience building processes; Risk-Informed Subnational Development Planning at all levels to put in place strong governance foundations so that risk-informed development can be sustained in near future planning and budgeting processes, tools, plans and policies, which in turn contributes directly to the implementation of Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the New Urban Agenda and SDGs.

Global Goal No. 18 as a new family member and Independent UN Partner for Decentralized Urban Cooperation to Assess and Enhance Strategic Effectiveness of UN in partnership with the UN-Habitat. The SDG18 would deliver risk-informed development through a comprehensive range of services, e.g. strengthen financial and institutional capacity within the Global Goals.

We can do this, do consider the seriousness and span of issues we raise in our representation for action on man-made hazards;

Outcome document-UN_Habitat_Urban Climatic Disaster Response – Adopt SDG18 – https://tvb-climatechallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/ClimateChangeCentreReading-UN_Habitat_Urban-Climatic-Disaster-Response-Adopt-SDG18.pdf

Thank you for taking your time and interest in also local urban resilient development. “Bigger picture thinkers make better humans”

Non-avoidable risk-impact assessment in urban planning and design – #wuf9kl

For once, please put your professional career on hold for just six days and take it to the 9th World Urban Forum (WUF9).
 
In just 17 years nothing is going to look the same again. The unprecedented threats from our changing climate being discussed are: Multi- droughts, floods, heat-waves, superstorms, forest fires, land degradation or tree diseases (beetles or fungi) and acid rains will have hit everyone everywhere. Mass-migration, warfare, airborne viruses, pathogen diseases and epidemies just to mention a few of the forth coming horrors… To slow down these non-avoidable man-made (non-climate related) hazard scenarios emergency and evacuation, we need to plan urban resilience right now.
 
Local government leaders must prioritise climate change action (CCA) to mitigate and prepare for urban disaster risk reduction (DRR).
 
The World Urban Forum is the one existing multi-scalar context to plan and prepare for global development in our changing climate, please take learning from its extensive and comprehensive programme and discussions between 7th to 13th February – http://wuf9.org. It offers a unique opportunity to share good practices from the cities resilience profiling programmes on the development and mainstreaming of DRR plans and multi-stakeholder’s engagement in the operationalization of resilience building strategies.
 
WUF9 will provide insightful examples for cities not only on the planning and implementing of the risk-sensitive plans but also on engaging multi-sectoral dialogue in resilience building processes.
 
This is a final call upon local governments leaders to develop integrated local Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and Resilience plans to guide their actions. Professionals, promote local-level-authorities power and capacity for resilience in developing and implementing DRR policies and actions in local legislation. It takes time to invest and deliver urban shock tolerance.
This call is as in effect an early warning system as a way of raising awareness and mobilising public interest more than that public demand for changes to reduce disaster risk.
Six days of your life, you can do this.
 
If worst come to worst, we must NOW plan for underground living. Urban Underground Space with the aim to increase mobility, liveability and resilience of urban area. Places urban underground space within the context of climate change, city resilience and rapid urbanisation.
 
“Bigger picture thinkers make better humans”, “SDGs will not be achieved unless we address climate risks and disaster risks”~Amina Mohamed UN Dpty Sec Gen
 
#Cities2030 #Citiesforall #NUA2030 #SDGs #WomensAssemblyWUF9 #COP24 #AAAA
#wuf9 #wuf9kl #forumbandarsedunia9 #MarrakeshPartnership #UCEEP #Bonn #Fiji #Talanoa
 
For once, please put your professional career on hold for just six days and take it to the 9th World Urban Forum (WUF9).
 
In just 17 years nothing is going to look the same again. The unprecedented threats from our changing climate being discussed are: Multi- droughts, floods, heat-waves, superstorms, forest fires, land degradation or tree diseases (beetles or fungi) and acid rains will have hit everyone everywhere. Mass-migration, warfare, airborne viruses, pathogen diseases and epidemies just to mention a few of the forth coming horrors… To slow down these non-avoidable man-made (non-climate related) hazard scenarios emergency and evacuation, we need to plan urban resilience right now.
 
Local government leaders must prioritise climate change action (CCA) to mitigate and prepare for urban disaster risk reduction (DRR).
 
The World Urban Forum is the one existing multi-scalar context to plan and prepare for global development in our changing climate, please take learning from its extensive and comprehensive programme and discussions between 7th to 13th February – http://wuf9.org. It offers a unique opportunity to share good practices from the cities resilience profiling programmes on the development and mainstreaming of DRR plans and multi-stakeholder’s engagement in the operationalization of resilience building strategies.
 
WUF9 will provide insightful examples for cities not only on the planning and implementing of the risk-sensitive plans but also on engaging multi-sectoral dialogue in resilience building processes.
 
This is a final call upon local governments leaders to develop integrated local Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and Resilience plans to guide their actions. Professionals, promote local-level-authorities power and capacity for resilience in developing and implementing DRR policies and actions in local legislation. It takes time to invest and deliver urban shock tolerance.
This call is as in effect an early warning system as a way of raising awareness and mobilising public interest more than that public demand for changes to reduce disaster risk.
Six days of your life, you can do this.
 
If worst come to worst, we must NOW plan for underground living. Urban Underground Space with the aim to increase mobility, liveability and resilience of urban area. Places urban underground space within the context of climate change, city resilience and rapid urbanisation.
 
“Bigger picture thinkers make better humans”, “SDGs will not be achieved unless we address climate risks and disaster risks”~Amina Mohamed UN Dpty Sec Gen
 
#Cities2030 #Citiesforall #NUA2030 #SDGs #WomensAssemblyWUF9 #SRSG #COP24 #AAAA
#wuf9 #wuf9kl #forumbandarsedunia9 #MarrakeshPartnership #UCEEP #Bonn #Fiji #Talanoa

Climate Chance Summit in Agadir

Morocco’s concerns about the climate are not fading. After Marrakesh, it is Agadir’s turn to bring together the concerned actors, but this time in the framework of a Summit. Indeed, the city of Agadir will host the 2nd;
WORLD CLIMATE CHANCE SUMMIT FOR NON-STATE ACTORS from September 11 to 13, 2017.

It’s a privilege to participate n’ #ClimateChance 2017, formalising the conversation on;
– reducing the vulnerability of countries to the impacts of climate change by strengthening their resilience adaptation.
– integration of adaptation to the climate change in development policies, programmes and projects as well as in National Budgeting.
– facilitation of access to climate risk transfer for disaster adaptation.
The first one took place in Nantes, this 2nd edition is Moroccan and will measure the progress of the action, To deepen exchanges on successes and difficulties and to foster the pooling of experiences and innovations. Also, this edition will place particular emphasis on the stakes of the African continent and more widely the countries of the South.

 

On this occasion, the organisers stressed: “Almost one year after COP22,  This Summit will be an opportunity to take stock of the agenda of the action and in particular the Marrakesh partnership. It will also be an opportunity to prepare joint messages to be delivered to States at the COP23 as a Follow-up The Nantes Declaration, which remains the most widely signed text by non-state actors. Since the adoption of the Rio Convention on Climate in 1992 “. It should be recalled that the Declaration of Nantes was adopted at the World Summit in September 2016 in Nantes and coordinated by the Climate Chance Association.

 

It has as its motto “Strengthening concrete action to bridge the gap between current commitments and the objective of the Paris Agreement”. The program of this edition consists of three usual pillars of Climate Chance:  There are first the forums to Take stock of COP23 on the actions of the 20 sectoral coalitions (transport, energy, etc.). To these forums are added plenaries, organised in the usual way of Climate Chance. These opening and closing plenaries will address the themes of Financing, the challenge of cities in Africa and migration. The workshops constitute the 3rd pillar. A call for papers was launched on 28 February and remained open until 15 May to decide on the workshops that will enrich the program and make it a moment of sharing and reflection. The selected contributors authorize the Climate Chance Association to reuse and communicate their work.

 

Climate Chance also thought about organising stands, totally free, Where non-state groups and African associations will be represented. The Summit also provided specific events to highlight crafts and local territory.

 

With more than 80 workshops of good practice, which will be presented around 17 themes affecting different sectors and a large participation involving more than 3,000 members, this 2nd edition of the Climate Chance Summit is promising.

 

Source: Libe’ration

#Africa and civil duty-to-respond to emergency programme in case of climatic hazard #UCCEP

Most national governments are initiating governance systems for adaptation. Disaster risk management, adjustments in technologies and infrastructure, ecosystem-based approaches, basic public health measures, and livelihood diversification are reducing vulnerability, although efforts to date tend to be isolated.

Disaster adaptation experience is accumulating across regions in the public and private sector and within communities. Disaster adaptation options adopted to date emphasise incremental adjustments and co-benefits and are starting to emphasise flexibility and learning. Most assessments of disaster adaptation have been restricted to impacts, vulnerability and disaster adaptation planning, with very few assessing the processes of implementation or the effects of disaster adaptation actions.

Future Pathways for Disaster Adaptation and Sustainable Development

Disaster adaptation and resilience are complementary strategies for reducing and managing the disaster risks of climate change. Substantial disaster response programmes and disaster assistance over near time can reduce climate risks in the 21st century and beyond, increase prospects for effective build back better efforts (Building better from start and adopt to the new normal), why build back better is so important to in learning and developing from hazard zones, reduce the costs and challenges of disaster adaptation in the longer term and contribute to climate-resilient pathways for sustainable development.

Disaster preparedness and sustainable development demonstrates the need and strategic considerations for both disaster adaptation and global-scale mitigation to manage risks from climate change. Building on these insights, disaster adaptation near-term response options that could help achieve such strategic goals. Near-term disaster adaptation and resilience actions will differ across sectors and regions, reflecting development status, response capacities and near- and long-term aspirations with regard to both climate and non-climate outcomes. Because disaster adaptation and resilience inevitably take place in the context of multiple objectives, particular attention is given to the ability to develop and implement integrated approaches that can build on co-benefits and manage trade-offs.

Policy approaches for disaster adaptation, technology and finance

Effective disaster adaptation responses will depend on policies and measures across multiple scales: international, regional, national and sub-national. Policies across all scales supporting technology development, diffusion and transfer, as well as finance for responses to climate change law, can complement and enhance the effectiveness of policies that directly promote disaster adaptation.

Institutional dimensions of adaptation governance, including the integration of adaptation into planning and decision-making, play a key role in promoting the transition from planning to implementation of adaptation. Examples of institutional approaches to adaptation involving multiple actors include economic options (e.g., insurance, public-private partnerships), laws and regulations (e.g., land-zoning laws) and national and government policies and programmes (e.g., economic diversification).

A first step towards disaster adaptation to future climate change is reducing vulnerability and exposure to present climate variability, but some near-term responses to climate change may also limit future choices. Integration of adaptation into planning, including policy design, and decision-making can promote synergies with development and disaster risk reduction. However, poor planning or implementation, overemphasising short-term outcomes or failing to sufficiently anticipate consequences can result in maladaptation, increasing the vulnerability or exposure of the target group in the future or the vulnerability of other people, places or sectors. For example, enhanced protection of exposed assets can lock in dependence on further protection measures. Appropriate adaptation options can be better assessed by including co-benefits and mitigation implications.

Co-benefits of disaster adaptation could affect achievement of other objectives, such as those related to energy security, air quality, efforts to address ecosystem impacts, income distribution, labour supply and employment and urban sprawl. In the absence of complementary policies, however, some disaster adaptation measures may have adverse side effects (at least in the short term), for example on biodiversity, food security, energy access, economic growth and income distribution. The co-benefits of disaster adaptation policies may include improved access to infrastructure and services, extended education and health systems, reduced disaster losses, better governance and others.

Comprehensive strategies in response to climate change law that are consistent with sustainable development take into account co-benefits. The assessment of overall social welfare impacts is complicated by this interaction between climate change response options and pre-existing non-climate policies. For example, in terms of air quality, the value of the extra tonne of sulphur dioxide (SO2) reduction that occurs with climate change mitigation through reduced fossil fuel combustion depends greatly on the stringency of SO2 control policies. If SO2 policy is weak, the value of SO2 reductions may be large, but if SO2 policy is stringent, it may be near zero. Similarly, in terms of adaptation and disaster risk management, weak policies can lead to an adaptation deficit that increases human and economic losses from natural climate variability. ‘Adaptation deficit’ refers to the lack of capacity to manage adverse impacts of current climate variability. An existing adaptation deficit increases the benefits of adaptation policies that improve the management of climate variability and change.

Response options for disaster adaptation

Disaster adaptation options exist in all sectors, but their context for implementation and potential to reduce climate-related risks differs across sectors and regions. Significant co-benefits, synergies and trade-offs exist between different disaster adaptation responses; interactions occur both within and across regions and sectors; For example, investments in crop varieties adapted to climate change can increase the capacity to cope with drought, and public health measures to address vector-borne diseases can enhance the capacity of health systems to address other challenges. Similarly, locating infrastructure away from low-lying coastal areas helps settlements and ecosystems adapt to sea level rise while also protecting against tsunamis. However, some disaster adaptation options may have adverse side effects that imply real or perceived trade-offs with other disaster adaptation objectives or broader development goals. For example, while protection of ecosystems can assist disaster adaptation to climate change, increased use of air conditioning to maintain thermal comfort in buildings or the use of desalination to enhance water resource security can increase energy demand.

Disaster adaptation options are not available in every major sector. Disaster adaptation can be more cost-effective if using an integrated approach that combines measures to reduce emergency assistance and enhance long term carbon sinks in land-based sectors (e.g. forest laws to reduce deforestation).

Increasing climate change will increase challenges for many disaster adaptation and resilience options.

Well-designed systemic and cross-sectoral disaster adaptation strategies are more cost-effective in disaster response than a focus on individual technologies and sectors with efforts in one sector affecting the need for disaster adaptation in others.

Institutional dimensions of disaster adaptation governance, including the integration of adaptation into planning and decision-making, play a key role in promoting the transition from planning to implementation of disaster adaptation.

The most commonly emphasized institutional barriers or enablers for adaptation planning and implementation are: 1) multilevel institutional co-ordination between different political and administrative levels in society; 2) key actors, advocates and champions initiating, mainstreaming and sustaining momentum for climate adaptation; 3) horizontal interplay between sectors, actors and policies operating at similar administrative levels; 4) political dimensions in planning and implementation; and 5) coordination between formal governmental, administrative agencies and private sectors and stakeholders to increase efficiency, representation and support for climate adaptation measures

Disaster adaptation measures intersect with other societal goals, creating the possibility of co‐benefits or adverse side‐effects. These intersections, if well‐managed, can strengthen the basis for undertaking climate mitigation actions

Disaster adaptation can positively or negatively influence the achievement of other societal goals, such as those related to human health, food security, biodiversity, local environmental quality, energy access, livelihoods and equitable sustainable development. On the other hand, policies towards other societal goals can influence the achievement of mitigation and other disaster adaptation objectives. These influences can be substantial, although sometimes difficult to quantify, especially in welfare terms. This multi‐objective perspective is important in part because it helps to identify areas where support for policies that advance multiple goals will be robust.

In increasing climate change, will increased disaster adaptation challenges and resilience help reverse the trend and strengthen the basis for undertaking and deliver climate mitigation actions?

Increasing resilience efforts to adapt to climate change law imply an increasing complexity of interactions, encompassing connections among human health, water, energy, land use and biodiversity. Disaster adaptation can support the achievement of other human right goals, such as those related to human health, food security, environmental quality, energy access, livelihoods and sustainable development, although there can also be negative effects. Disaster adaptation and resilience measures also have the potential to undertaking and deliver mitigation co-benefits, and vice versa, and support other societal goals, though trade-offs can also arise.

Overall, the potential for co-benefits for disaster adaptation end-use emergency response measures outweigh the potential for adverse side effects, whereas the evidence suggests this may not be the case for Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU) measures.

 

Source: Our Climate Chance summary and integrated view on policy sectoral co-benefits relate to disaster risk law in the final part of the IPCC’s Key Findings – Fifth Assessment Report